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Ron Waggoner | profile | all galleries >> Cold Bay Air Force Station, Alaska >> Three Volcanos (Click on image for more photos) tree view | thumbnails | slideshow

Three Volcanos (Click on image for more photos)

Back when I had already been notified that I would be assigned to Cold Bay, I heard on the news that Jean Dixon, a noted prognosticator of the time, had predicted that California would fall into the Pacific Ocean. She also had predicted that, within one year, the Alaska Peninsula would do the same. Later, after I had spent some time there, I understood why she had included that area in her prediction. The peninsula was definitely volcanic in nature, as earth tremors were common occurrences. In fact, the area was so unstable that the government was monitoring seismic activity on Grant Point, near the radar site, as well as other locations nearby. While I was aware of the tremors and the monitoring, I never really let it bother me. I guess I just took a fatalistic attitude about the whole thing, not worrying about sinking into the sea because of an earthquake. Perhaps the most impressive aspect about the seismic instability in the region was that there were volcanos on three sides of Cold Bay. On the rare days when the sky was clear, we could see smoke and/or steam rising from two of them. The third, Amak, was the closest, but I don't recall any evidence of thermal activity visable from the vantage point at the radar site. However, I was told that Amak was charred from activity on her north face.
Shishaldin and Castle
Shishaldin and Castle
Mt. Pavlov
Mt. Pavlov
Amak in the Morning
Amak in the Morning
 Amak at Sunset
Amak at Sunset