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edmund j. kowalski | profile | all galleries >> Galleries >> Purma Plus and Sandy Creek Bridge tree view | thumbnails | slideshow

Purma Plus and Sandy Creek Bridge

This camera was sent to me by my good friend who lives in the Greater Liverpool area (England).
The Purma Plus is totally English made, circa 1951. It was considered an improvement over the Purma Special (prewar).
Lens is fixed focus / fixed aperture coated f:6.3 / 55mm.
Shutter is metal, focal plane... three speeds, they are largely controlled by Earth's gravity, the speed selected by the orientation in which the camera body is held.
The camera uses 127 size film, in a square format, known as "half frame 127," advancing each number first to the lefthand red window, then to the righthand window, to yield 16 frames per roll.

The engraving on the leather case indicates that, presumably, this camera spent some time on board the HMS Belfast. That ship, a Heavy Cruiser in the British Navy, was built during WW II, saw action in several conflicts over a long career, and was finally decommissioned in the mid 1960s.

I film tested the camera at Sandy Creek, Jefferson County, Missouri, at the site of one of the last remaining covered bridges in the State of Missouri. The weather was generally overcast.
One frame near the end is from the Pevely Flea Market.
The roll was finished off here in my studio, closeups at approximately 24 inches, with the aid of an auxiliary +2 diopter filter.

This film was rerolled from larger stock into 127 backing paper by a party on the East Coast, sent to me by mail. Apparently, the film was damaged by either heat, age, chemistry, or x-ray, (before or after it was in the camera), in some mysterious way....
the developed filmstrip is gradated in tint, through the entire color spectrum, beginning with a red/amber tint, going through yellow and green, and ending up with a deep blue tint at end of roll.
One of the last remaining major labs in this region was able to develop the film to negative, but could not scan or print it for a reasonable price, due to size format.
I paid for the chemical developing, then did the scanning myself with my Epson transparency scanner. It was difficult to a degree. The scanner's automation would not recognize the size format, and I had to use several tricks to get what I did.
I then tweaked the images in ACDSee.

Remember, click on thumbnails to see enlarged.
All images are 2008 E.J.Kowalski.

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