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Nikkormat Gallery


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I managed specialty camera stores in the 1970's and checked out lots of 35mm's. I was there when the Pentax', Canons, Nikons, Olympus', Minoltas all competed with very good SLR options, but my choice was finally a Nikkormat FTn. "The Nikkormat SLRs were moderately priced, advanced amateur level stablemates to Nippon Kogaku's premium priced, professional level Nikon F and F2 SLRs. Just as the Nikkor and Nikon brand names had established Nippon Kogaku as a world class maker of lenses and high-end cameras, respectively, with professional photographers before it, Nikkormat made amateurs sit up and take notice." (Source: All Experts).


Somewhere along the line I let my original Nikkormat go. I don't even remember whom I sold it to, but I have often found myself feeling sad about it. The next Nikon I owned was a FG-20. It is a Nikon with autoexposure, apeture preferred, but with a plastic housing, it has never brought me as much confidence and joy as did the Nikkormat. The Nikkormat got me into the F-series club. I never missed the removable prism, backs, or motor drive capability of the F's, nor did I care about the prestige factor which F owners seemed to garner. I just wanted a good camera and I got what I wanted with the Nikkormat, but eventually parted with it for no apparently good reason.



"Designed with sharp and clear-cut lines, the external appearance of the Nikkormat camera body gives an overall feeling of mechanical precision and dependability associated with professional use. The camera body is made of die-cast aluminum alloy and finished in chrome plating and assembled of 685 separate components. The (Nikkormat) FTn was introduced and marketed in 1967 and continued to serve even after later models were introduced." (Source: The Camera Site).

See: Nikon's first prodution 35mm


Update: So I purchased a new-old Nikkormat! My first new image is here to share*. I am wrought with excitement as I am becoming reaquainted with what I absolutely know to be one of the best camreas ever made. I own a Nikon digital SLR but I still expect to get good film-based images with my new-old Nikkormat. These are the images I got with my old Nikkormat about thirty years ago:

Clerical then Assistant Manager, Ray's Cameras, Puyallup WA (1970-1), Assistant Manager, Cameras Et Cetera, Southcenter Mall, Seattle, WA (1972), Manager Camera's et Cetera South Sound Mall, Lacey, WA (1972-3), Camera's Et Cetera, Southcenter Mall, Tukwila, WA (1973-4), Clerical, camera department, Jafco, Bellevue, WA (1974-1976), Camera Department Manager, Jafco/Best's, Tukwila (Southcenter) (1977-1978), Clerical again while in college, Best's, Spokane, WA.

This image was from on the coast near Ozette on the Olympic Peninsula. The camera is my favorite, the Nikkormat FTn with a Nikkor 200mm F4 telephoto lens.
J. R. Hudson - The Photographer - 1973


Clerical then Assistant Manager, Ray's Cameras, Puyallup WA (1970-1), Assistant Manager, Cameras Et Cetera, Southcenter Mall, Seattle, WA (1972), Manager Camera's et Cetera South Sound Mall, Lacey, WA (1972-3), Camera's Et Cetera, Southcenter Mall, Tukwila, WA (1973-4), Clerical, camera department, Jafco, Bellevue, WA (1974-1976), Camera Department Manager, Jafco/Best's, Tukwila (Southcenter) (1977-1978), Clerical again while in college, Best's, Spokane, WA.

This image was from on the coast near Ozette on the Olympic Peninsula. The camera is my favorite, the Nikkormat FTn with a Nikkor 200mm F4 telephoto lens.

Nikkormat - The Camera
Nikkormat - The Camera
This has always been a favorite image of mine. These people made it to the top of a smaller mountain named Burroughs Mountain, a reward for a mildly agressive day hike from Sunrise near Mount Rainier. The peak beyond them is Little Tahoma Peak, flanking Mount Rainier which is out of view. The people are gazing at the larger mountain, Mount Rainier. This is what they are looking at.
Burroughs Mountain View of Little Tahoma

This has always been a favorite image of mine. These people made it to the top of a smaller mountain named Burroughs Mountain, a reward for a mildly agressive day hike from Sunrise near Mount Rainier. The peak beyond them is Little Tahoma Peak, flanking Mount Rainier which is out of view. The people are gazing at the larger mountain, Mount Rainier. This is what they are looking at.

This is the mountain the people on the left are viewing - Mount Rainier. The expanse below houses the Emmons Glacier which has the distinction of being the largest surface area of any glacier in the contiguous United States.
Mount Rainier from Burroughs Mountain

This is the mountain the people on the left are viewing - Mount Rainier. The expanse below houses the Emmons Glacier which has the distinction of being the largest surface area of any glacier in the contiguous United States.

Girls on the beach near Ocean Shores, Washington. See more beach scenes (click)
Girls on the Beach

Girls on the beach near Ocean Shores, Washington. See more beach scenes (click)

Gazing westward over the Strait of Juan de Fuca, where winds in excess of a hundred miles an hour peppered with saltwater spray often pound, are the cliffs of Partridge Point on the west side of Whidbey Island. Now a housing development, the spot where this spruce tree once stood alone, is in someone’s yard now. I was, however, able to capture the image before the development took place. This image is “contrasty” and simplistic, making it a prime example of my standard style of imagery and composition. See more seascapes.
Windswept Spruce, Whidbey Island

Gazing westward over the Strait of Juan de Fuca, where winds in excess of a hundred miles an hour peppered with saltwater spray often pound, are the cliffs of Partridge Point on the west side of Whidbey Island. Now a housing development, the spot where this spruce tree once stood alone, is in someone’s yard now. I was, however, able to capture the image before the development took place. This image is “contrasty” and simplistic, making it a prime example of my standard style of imagery and composition. See more seascapes.

See more seascapes (click)
West Sound Landing

See more seascapes (click)

This is from the first roll of film that I have run through a Nikkormat in probably over 20 years. It is taken with a Kodak black and white film that can be processed with color films (BW400CN Professional - a C41 process).
*Suspension Bridge over the Snoqualmie River

This is from the first roll of film that I have run through a Nikkormat in probably over 20 years. It is taken with a Kodak black and white film that can be processed with color films (BW400CN Professional - a C41 process).

An old favorite. Lost in the archives for about 20 years not viewed, not printed. Taken with a Nikkormat in the rainforests of Washington State.
Trillium

An old favorite. Lost in the archives for about 20 years not viewed, not printed. Taken with a Nikkormat in the rainforests of Washington State.

This larger sailboat, a twin-mast ketch, passed my smaller sailboat and I captured the sun a split second before it was blocked by the foresail. I moored on the same dock and asked about the boat and found it was owned by a dentist. The boat’s name was the Bering Sea. I sold an 11 by 14 inch copy of this image to the boat’s owner in 1974.See more sailing pictures (click)
Ketch "Behring Sea" Puget Sound

This larger sailboat, a twin-mast ketch, passed my smaller sailboat and I captured the sun a split second before it was blocked by the foresail. I moored on the same dock and asked about the boat and found it was owned by a dentist. The boat’s name was the Bering Sea. I sold an 11 by 14 inch copy of this image to the boat’s owner in 1974.
See more sailing pictures (click)

Many pictures of Mount Rainier feature an unframed mountain, but I have a personal satisfaction with this one. I framed the mountain with the last stand of the fir trees immediately below the slopes on Rainier’s southern side near Paradise. See more mountains (click)
Mt Rainier Through Trees

Many pictures of Mount Rainier feature an unframed mountain, but I have a personal satisfaction with this one. I framed the mountain with the last stand of the fir trees immediately below the slopes on Rainier’s southern side near Paradise. See more mountains (click)

My first sailboat.

Originally founded in Sausalito, CA, the goal of Clipper Marine, was to build trailerable fiberglass boats and hence, are reported to be the first to use the swing keel in a small vessel. All of the boats were designed by W.I.B. Crealock of Pacific Seacraft fame. His original CM design was the Clipper 21. In the early 70’s production was moved to Santa Ana and more models came off of the production line. They built a Clipper 21 MkII and then soon followed the CM 26, the CM 23 (1/4-tonner race boat to compete with Carl Schumacher & Bruce Farr designs), and a CM 30, CM 23 “Bilge Border” and finally the CM 32.
"Clipper" At Rest

My first sailboat.

Originally founded in Sausalito, CA, the goal of Clipper Marine, was to build trailerable fiberglass boats and hence, are reported to be the first to use the swing keel in a small vessel. All of the boats were designed by W.I.B. Crealock of Pacific Seacraft fame. His original CM design was the Clipper 21. In the early 70’s production was moved to Santa Ana and more models came off of the production line. They built a Clipper 21 MkII and then soon followed the CM 26, the CM 23 (1/4-tonner race boat to compete with Carl Schumacher & Bruce Farr designs), and a CM 30, CM 23 “Bilge Border” and finally the CM 32.

Actually the bridge name is really the O'Farrell Bridge, built in 1921. It is downstream from the old coal mining town of Melmont, upstream from Carbonado about 3 miles. The total bridge span is 494 feet with the steel part of the bridge being 240 feet. You can walk the old rail grade to Melmont from the bridge. There is a short trail drops down on the north side of the bridge to the rail line. Head upstream and about 3/4 of a mile up you start to find foundations of an old retaining wall. The mine was actually on the south side of the river there and is still there closed off with huge old timber doors.

Latitude, longitude: +47.04139, -122.04056
Carbon River Bridge

Actually the bridge name is really the "O'Farrell Bridge", built in 1921. It is downstream from the old coal mining town of Melmont, upstream from Carbonado about 3 miles. The total bridge span is 494 feet with the steel part of the bridge being 240 feet. You can walk the old rail grade to Melmont from the bridge. There is a short trail drops down on the north side of the bridge to the rail line. Head upstream and about 3/4 of a mile up you start to find foundations of an old retaining wall. The mine was actually on the south side of the river there and is still there closed off with huge old timber doors.

Latitude, longitude: +47.04139, -122.04056

Pilings
Pilings
Ozette Rocks
Ozette Rocks
“Schooner Shaw Island,” was the first picture I ever took inside of the San Juan Islands of Washington. After quitting my job at a camera store in order to temporarily become a “sailing bum,” I sailed a small sailboat from Gig Harbor in south Puget Sound up North through the San Juan Islands, then back again. After sailing in pre-summer weather in June, flirting with capsizing conditions, enduring a thunderstorm, then approaching the Shaw Island ferry landing, I took this image with a telephoto lens. For years I had not been able to identify this schooner but recently, after talking with local “historians” and reviewing many images of local schooners, I have come to the conclusion this is the Martha http://bit.ly/1471Z4C.

The telephoto lens exaggerates cumulous clouds far behind the ship. Appearing to be night, this was midday. I used a blue filter and underexposed the exposure in order to achieve the appearance of night.

See my sailing gallery (click)
Schooner Shaw Island

“Schooner Shaw Island,” was the first picture I ever took inside of the San Juan Islands of Washington. After quitting my job at a camera store in order to temporarily become a “sailing bum,” I sailed a small sailboat from Gig Harbor in south Puget Sound up North through the San Juan Islands, then back again. After sailing in pre-summer weather in June, flirting with capsizing conditions, enduring a thunderstorm, then approaching the Shaw Island ferry landing, I took this image with a telephoto lens. For years I had not been able to identify this schooner but recently, after talking with local “historians” and reviewing many images of local schooners, I have come to the conclusion this is the Martha http://bit.ly/1471Z4C.

The telephoto lens exaggerates cumulous clouds far behind the ship. Appearing to be night, this was midday. I used a blue filter and underexposed the exposure in order to achieve the appearance of night.

See my sailing gallery (click)

Ozette Area Olympic Penninsula
Ozette Area Olympic Penninsula
Clipper and South Sound Sunset
"Clipper" and South Sound Sunset
“Red Flowers, Olympics” was taken on a hiking trip into the Olympic Mountains around 1973. Captured deep in the Duckabush valley as it cuts into the Olympic Mountains from the east side of the range. The image was extracted from a severely color-impared negative. The color may have distorted by heat, or by some other condition which was very detrimental to the film. I remember experimenting with bulk 35mm movie film at one time and this may have been with it. Without the capabilities of digital processing, the negative to produce this image surely would have been rendered unusable.
Red Flowers Misty Olympic Mountains

“Red Flowers, Olympics” was taken on a hiking trip into the Olympic Mountains around 1973. Captured deep in the Duckabush valley as it cuts into the Olympic Mountains from the east side of the range. The image was extracted from a severely color-impared negative. The color may have distorted by heat, or by some other condition which was very detrimental to the film. I remember experimenting with bulk 35mm movie film at one time and this may have been with it. Without the capabilities of digital processing, the negative to produce this image surely would have been rendered unusable.

Popularly called the Fox Island Lighthouse was actually built as a part of a boys camp on Graves Island (later renamed Taglewood Island) in the 1940's. It is actually not on Fox Island, a larger island nearby. The top of the 'lighthouse' appears to have vanished as evidenced in more recent images.
Fox Island Lighthouse (actually on Tanglewood Island) Puget Sound, Washington

Popularly called the "Fox Island Lighthouse" was actually built as a part of a boys camp on Graves Island (later renamed Taglewood Island) in the 1940's. It is actually not on Fox Island, a larger island nearby. The top of the 'lighthouse' appears to have vanished as evidenced in more recent images.

Moon Over Meadow, taken around midnight off of Highway 101 on the Olympic Peninsula, Washington.
Moon Over Meadow

Moon Over Meadow, taken around midnight off of Highway 101 on the Olympic Peninsula, Washington.


(84 page views since 22-JAN-08 before update 08-AUG-08)
Homestead Olympic Peninsula


(84 page views since 22-JAN-08 before update 08-AUG-08)

The “Vine Maple” image could have been taken anywhere in the lowland forests around Puget Sound, Washington. It is most everywhere in Western Washington and it glows a bright red each fall. Contrasting subjects is a technique that I like to employ as in this image. See more from the gallery where this is located (click)
Vine Maple

The “Vine Maple” image could have been taken anywhere in the lowland forests around Puget Sound, Washington. It is most everywhere in Western Washington and it glows a bright red each fall. Contrasting subjects is a technique that I like to employ as in this image. See more from the gallery where this is located (click)

These samples I took with (A) film (Kodacolor 200) using a Nikon Nikkormat FTn and a 35-105 zoom, and, B) digitally (ISO 100) with a Nikon D40X and a 18-135mm zoom. Both samples are at 200dpi resolution and at approximatey 200X size. The film medium, although seemingly very sharp, is very granular when compared to the digital image. I was not sure what the scan resolution was, though I was told it was high-resolution. Both images are at 200dpi. Being aware of the ISO difference, however the grain is so very much more pronounced than any noise the digital image picks up.

Although a DX digital sensor (16x24mm) is small compared to the 35mm film's image area (24x36mm), the digital image result is extraordinary. All things being equal, I just enjoy picking up, loading, and shooting my Nikkormat camera. To me, it is a mechanical thing of beauty.
Film vs Digital Comparison

These samples I took with (A) film (Kodacolor 200) using a Nikon Nikkormat FTn and a 35-105 zoom, and, B) digitally (ISO 100) with a Nikon D40X and a 18-135mm zoom. Both samples are at 200dpi resolution and at approximatey 200X size. The film medium, although seemingly very sharp, is very granular when compared to the digital image. I was not sure what the scan resolution was, though I was told it was "high-resolution". Both images are at 200dpi. Being aware of the ISO difference, however the "grain" is so very much more pronounced than any "noise" the digital image picks up.

Although a DX digital sensor (16x24mm) is small compared to the 35mm film's image area (24x36mm), the digital image result is extraordinary. All things being equal, I just enjoy picking up, loading, and shooting my Nikkormat camera. To me, it is a mechanical thing of beauty.