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Teila K. Day | profile | all galleries >> Fast aperture (or lens) vs. slow aperture (or lens) tree view | thumbnails | slideshow

Fast aperture (or lens) vs. slow aperture (or lens)

First Click On The 1st Photo, THEN toggle back and forth between it and the next photo (fast aperture versus a slower one) to see the difference using the arrow keys on your key board.

When toggling back and forth quickly between a fast and slow aperture setting you can often see a major difference that only one stop difference in aperture can make. Things start to get even more interesting when you ad teleconverters (extenders) to the mix, because usually you will want to stop down a stop or two for added image quality... something to think about if you're using a lens that has a widest aperture of f/4 or 5.6.

Do keep in mind that the camera focuses with your lens wide open, stopping the lens down only after you're pressed the shutter button; thus a lens with a wider aperture will generally allow for better focusing in low-light (less "hunting") and will provide the photographer with a brighter viewfinder.

F/4 is considered "fast" for super telephoto lenses, however for lenses 400mm or less, the difference between the f/4 version and the f/2.8 version of the same telephoto lens (or even a wide or normal lens) can be as different as night and day... likewise the price.

What follows are fast and dirty real world differences between a fast and slow apertures.
#1a - the Canon 24-70 at f2.8
#1a - the Canon 24-70 at f2.8
#1B - the Canon 24-70 at f4
#1B - the Canon 24-70 at f4
#2a - the Canon 24-70 at f2.8
#2a - the Canon 24-70 at f2.8
#2B - the Canon 24-70 at f4
#2B - the Canon 24-70 at f4